Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS)

Stewardship is about taking care of something that we do not own. Good water stewards recognise the need for collective responses to the complex challenges facing the water resources we all rely on.

AWS is a global membership collaboration comprising businesses, NGOs and the public sector. AWS members contribute to the sustainability of local water-resources through their adoption and promotion of a universal framework for the sustainable use of water – the International Water Stewardship Standard, or AWS Standard – that drives, recognises and rewards good water stewardship performance.

AWS Vision and Mission

Vision: a water-secure world that enables people, cultures, business and nature to prosper, now and in the future.

To achieve this, AWS’ mission is to: Ignite and nurture global and local leadership in credible water stewardship that recognises and secures the social, cultural, environmental and economic value of freshwater.

Why water stewardship?

Growing populations and economies, changing lifestyles and global climate change are putting increasing pressure on our water resources. Major water users, governments, cities and citizens all recognize the urgent need to work together to ensure the sustainability of this vital resource on which we all depend. Water stewardship enables water users to work together to identify and achieve common goals for sustainable water management and shared water security.

What is water stewardship?

AWS defines water stewardship as the use of water that is socially and culturally equitable, environmentally sustainable and economically beneficial, achieved through a stakeholder-inclusive process that includes both site- and catchment-based actions.

Read more about how we aim to accelerate impact and our goals, outcomes and priorities in the AWS Strategy 2022-2030.

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