Seacology

Protecting the unique habitats and cultures of islands worldwide

Seacology works to protect all kinds of island habitats, from coral reefs to coastal wetlands to mountain forests (and more). But recently, more and more of Seacology’s projects have concentrated on three island ecosystems: mangroves, peatlands, and seagrass.

Seacology believes that environmental issues are human issues. When an island community wants to protect a forest or marine area, Seacology offers a grant that will benefit the whole community—for example, a school, ecotourism center, or water system.

This win-win approach recognizes the efforts of indigenous communities and gives them an economic incentive to preserve their natural resources.

It also recognizes that local communities can be the best stewards of the environment. Seacology’s experience has shown that indigenous people have tremendous ecological knowledge, commitment to sustainable use, and ability to manage their natural resources. Studies show that indigenous knowledge and management improve the monitoring of ecological changes, the fostering of biodiversity, and the preservation of valuable ecosystems and can reduce poverty. Learn more at Seacology.org.

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